Table of Contents > Herbs & Supplements > Celery (Apium graveolens) Print

Celery (Apium graveolens)

Image

Also listed as: Apium graveolens
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • 7-O-apiosylglucoside, alpha-methylene gamma-butyrolactone group, Api g, Api g 4, Api g 4 profilin, Apiaceae (family), apigenin, Apium graveolens spp., ascorbic acid, bergapten, celeriac, celery extract, celery juice, celery profilin, celery root, celery seed, celery seed oil, celery soup, celery spice, celery tuber, cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, crude celery, falcarindiol, falcarinol, furocoumarins, immunogenic food, isopimpinellin, luteolin, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen), methoxypsoralen, phthalide, profilin, psoralen, raw celery, sedanolide, seselin, sodium, Umbelliferae (family), xanthotoxin.

Background
  • Wild celery is found throughout Europe, around the Mediterranean, and in parts of Asia. The leaves, stalks, root, and seeds are edible. In Western cuisine, the stalks of its domesticated relative are commonly eaten raw alone or in salads, or as a cooked ingredient in various recipes. Celery seed has also been used as a diuretic and to treat gout.
  • Allergy to celery is fairly common, as celery contains an allergen similar to the birch pollen allergen. Both raw and cooked celery may cause reactions that range from contact dermatitis to anaphylactic shock. Celery contains the chemical psoralen. Contact with or ingestion of cooked or raw celery followed by exposure to ultraviolet radiation (such as from tanning) may cause an acute skin reaction, with symptoms including swelling and redness or, with ongoing exposure, excess skin darkening at the contact site.
  • The ancient Greeks and Egyptians cultivated celery, which was probably originally used as a medicine. Some Egyptian tombs also contained celery leaves and flowers.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *


According to preliminary research, an herbal product containing celery may be useful for painful menstruation. Research evaluating celery alone for this use is needed.

C


According to preliminary research, celery may lower blood pressure. Caution is warranted, as celery may contain sodium. High-quality research is needed before a conclusion can be drawn.

C


Preliminary research suggests that a celery extract may be an effective mosquito repellent. Additional research is needed in this area.

C
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Aflatoxin toxicity, anthelmintic (acts against parasitic worms), antibacterial, anticonvulsant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiseptic, athletic performance, breast cancer, cancer, cerebral ischemia (insufficient blood flow to the brain), chemotherapy side effects, colon cancer, cystitis (bladder inflammation), dental conditions, detoxification, diabetes, diuretic (increases urination), energy enhancement, fever, food preservative, gastric cancer, gout, high cholesterol, inflammatory joint diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis), insecticide, jaundice, kidney disorders, leukemia, liver cancer, liver damage from drugs or toxins, liver protection, lung cancer, multiple sclerosis, neuroprotection, pain, parasitic infections, reproduction disorders, tonic, toxicity, ulcer, weight loss.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

  • A celery-based product has been used on the skin as a mosquito repellant.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for celery in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to celery (Apium graveolens), its constituents, or members of the Apiaceae or Umbelliferae families.
  • Allergy to celery is fairly common, as celery contains an allergen similar to the birch pollen allergen. Other chemical compounds related to birch pollen allergens are those found in apple, cherry, hazelnut, carrot, and soybean. Specific reported cross-sensitivities include anise, apple, Artemisia vulgaris (mugwort) pollen, birch pollen, caraway, carrot, chamomile, Chinese bellflower root, coriander, corn, cucumber, cumin, fennel, garlic, grape, grass pollens, hazelnut, hops, latex, legumes, mango, nuts, olive pollen, onion, paprika, parsley, parsnip, peaches, peanut, pepper, pineapple, pistachio nuts, poppy, potato, ragweed, rice, spices, sunflower, tomato, watermelon, and zucchini.
  • Allergy to celery, mugwort, birch, dandelion, and carrot may be called "celery-carrot-mugwort-condiment" or "celery-carrot-mugwort-spice" syndrome.
  • Raw or cooked celery or celery juice may cause allergic reactions. Symptoms of celery allergy include oral allergy syndrome, eczema (skin rashes), swelling under the skin, burning or inflammation of the skin following exposure to light, hives, dermatitis (skin inflammation), laryngeal swelling, celery-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (life-threatening reaction), anaphylactic shock (life-threatening reaction), intoxication, and swelling. Immediate symptoms of skin inflammation caused by celery and light exposure include skin eruption with swelling and redness; the main long-term symptom is darkening of the skin at the eruption site.
  • Oral celery juice been used for successful hyposensitization (to make less sensitive to something).
  • Intake of allergenic foods such as celery during pregnancy may increase the risk of sensitization (to make more sensitive) to food allergens.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Celery may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that lower blood pressure. Use cautiously in patients with high blood pressure, as celery contains relatively high amounts of sodium (3-9 milligrams per two grams).
  • Celery may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.
  • Celery may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of these drugs may be decreased or increased in the blood and may cause altered effects or potentially serious adverse reactions. Patients taking any medications should check the package insert and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions.
  • Drowsiness or sedation may occur. Use caution if driving or operating heavy machinery.
  • Use cautiously in patients who will be exposed to ultraviolet radiation.
  • Use cautiously in patients using photosensitizing (to make sensitive to light) agents, as celery may increase the risk of sun damage. Some chemical compounds in food plants of the Apiaceae family, including celery, have displayed neurotoxic (toxic to neurons) effects.
  • Use cautiously in patients taking cholesterol- and triglyceride-lowering agents, as celery extract may reduce serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and may either increase or decrease triglyceride levels.
  • Use cautiously in patients with bile secretion disorders or those with misaligned teeth.
  • Use cautiously in those using anticonvulsants, as pretreatment with celery juices prolonged the action of pentobarbital.
  • Avoid in patients eating large amounts of psoralen-containing foods or herbs.
  • Avoid medicinal amounts during pregnancy, as celery may induce abortion. Intake of allergenic foods such as celery during pregnancy may increase the risk of sensitization (to make more sensitive) to food allergens.
  • Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to celery (Apium graveolens), its constituents, members of the Apiaceae or Umbelliferae family, or any birch pollen-related antigens. Other chemical compounds related to birch pollen allergens are those found in apple, cherry, hazelnut, carrot, and soybean. Specific reported cross-sensitivities include anise, apple, Artemisia vulgaris (mugwort) pollen, birch pollen, caraway, carrot, chamomile, Chinese bellflower root, coriander, corn, cucumber, cumin, fennel, garlic, grape, grass pollens, hazelnut, hops, latex, legumes, mango, nuts, olive pollen, onion, paprika, parsley, parsnip, peaches, peanut, pepper, pineapple, pistachio nuts, poppy, potato, ragweed, rice, spices, sunflower, tomato, watermelon, and zucchini. Symptoms of celery allergy include oral allergy syndrome, eczema, swelling under the skin, skin burn or inflammation when exposed to light, hives, skin inflammation, laryngeal swelling, celery-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (life-threatening reaction), anaphylactic shock (life-threatening reaction), intoxication, and swelling.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

  • Avoid medicinal amounts during pregnancy, as celery may induce abortion. Intake of allergenic foods such as celery during pregnancy may increase the risk of sensitization (to make more sensitive) to food allergens.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Celery may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
  • Celery may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs that lower blood pressure.
  • Celery may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of these drugs may be decreased or increased in blood and may cause altered effects or potentially serious adverse reactions. Patients using any medications should check the package insert and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions.
  • Celery may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines such as lorazepam (Ativan®) or diazepam (Valium®), barbiturates such as phenobarbital and pentobarbital, narcotics such as codeine, some antidepressants, and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.
  • Celery may also interact with ACE inhibitors, alcohol, anticonvulsants, antispasmodics, antiulcer agents, aspirin, beta-blockers, cholesterol- and triglyceride-lowering drugs, diuretics, doxorubicin, light-sensitizing agents, pain relievers, salicylates, and valproic acid.

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

  • Celery may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
  • Celery may lower blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking other herbs or supplements with blood pressure-altering activity.
  • Celery may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of other herbs or supplements may become too low or too high in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the cytochrome P450 system.
  • Celery may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.
  • Celery may also interact with anticonvulsants, antioxidants, antispasmodics, antiulcer herbs and supplements, cholesterol- and triglyceride-lowering herbs and supplements, diuretics, insect repellants, light-sensitizing agents, pain relievers, perillyl alcohol-containing agents and foods, psoralens, salicylate-containing herbs, and willow bark.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Asero R, Mistrello G, Roncarolo D, et al. Immunological cross-reactivity between lipid transfer proteins from botanically unrelated plant-derived foods: a clinical study. Allergy 2002;57(10):900-906.
  2. Ballmer-Weber BK, Hoffmann A, Wuthrich B, et al. Influence of food processing on the allergenicity of celery: DBPCFC with celery spice and cooked celery in patients with celery allergy. Allergy 2002;57(3):228-235.
  3. Cheng MC, Ker YB, Yu TH, et al. Chemical synthesis of 9(Z)-octadecenamide and its hypolipidemic effect: a bioactive agent found in the essential oil of mountain celery seeds. J Agric Food Chem 2010;58(3):1502-1508.
  4. Chu YF, Sun J, Wu X, et al. Antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of common vegetables. J Agric Food Chem 2002;50(23):6910-6916.
  5. Darsow U, Laifaoui J, Kerschenlohr K, et al. The prevalence of positive reactions in the atopy patch test with aeroallergens and food allergens in subjects with atopic eczema: a European multicenter study. Allergy 2004;59(12):1318-1325.
  6. DeLeo VA. Photocontact dermatitis. Dermatol Ther 2004;17(4):279-288.
  7. Erdmann SM, Sachs B, Schmidt A, et al. analysis of birch-pollen-associated food allergy by use of recombinant allergens in the basophil activation test. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2005;136(3):230-238.
  8. Jahn-Schmid B, Radakovics A, Luttkopf D, et al. Bet v 1142-156 is the dominant T-cell epitope of the major birch pollen allergen and important for cross-reactivity with Bet v 1-related food allergens. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2005;116(1):213-219.
  9. Moneret-Vautrin DA, Morisset M, Lemerdy P, et al. Food allergy and IgE sensitization caused by spices: CICBAA data (based on 589 cases of food allergy). Allerg Immunol (Paris) 2002;34(4):135-140.
  10. Nahid K, Fariborz M, Ataolah G, et al. The effect of an Iranian herbal drug on primary dysmenorrhea: a clinical controlled trial. J Midwifery Womens Health 2009;54(5):401-404.
  11. Ott H, Folster-Holst R, Merk HF, et al. Allergen microarrays: a novel tool for high-resolution IgE profiling in adults with atopic dermatitis. Eur J Dermatol 2010;20(1):54-61.
  12. Sausenthaler S, Koletzko S, Schaaf B, et al. Maternal diet during pregnancy in relation to eczema and allergic sensitization in the offspring at 2 y of age. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85(2):530-537.
  13. Tuetun B, Choochote W, Pongpaibul Y, et al. Field evaluation of G10, a celery ()-based topical repellent, against mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand. Parasitol Res 2009;104(3):515-521.
  14. Tuetun B, Choochote W, Pongpaibul Y, et al. Celery-based topical repellents as a potential natural alternative for personal protection against mosquitoes. Parasitol Res 2008;104(1):107-115.
  15. Tuetun B, Choochote W, Kanjanapothi D, et al. Repellent properties of celery, L., compared with commercial repellents, against mosquitoes under laboratory and field conditions. Trop Med Int Health 2005;10(11):1190-1198.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

    Top Health
    Conditions
    To learn more, select a condition from the following menu.


    Healthy Living Marketplace
    Aubrey Organics
    Solgar
    Lily of the Desert
    Manitoba
    MegaFood
    Olbas